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Transition Talk

by Mike Arsenault, Vice President of Candidate Services

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Article Sponsored by: Grantham University

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This brings us to another consideration. Who do you think will leave more reviews, disgruntled employees or satisfied ones? We might expect that the satisfied ones are too busy doing their jobs to leave reviews. Further, it has been reported that some companies with bad reviews urge employees to go leave good reviews to balance the negative ones out (whether the employees really want to or not!). Finally, you should also be aware that part of the business model of some of the review sites is to contact companies with negative reviews and (for a fee) help them improve their reputation.


With all this being said, my advice would be to go to the interview. You will be better able to make up your own mind after talking to the hiring manager. They should be well aware of the negative comments/reviews. If the interview has gone well, don’t be afraid to ask about it when it’s time for your questions towards the end of the interview. You can try to determine if there was some specific reason, e.g., management changes, different ownership, new policies, etc. that may have been a driver of the negative comments.


Worse case, consider it to be practice for other interviews ahead. But you may find that, despite some negative comments online, the company and the job are just what you’ve been hoping to land.

Mike Arsenault is Vice President of Candidate Services at military placement firm Bradley-Morris, Inc. He can be reached at (800) 330-4950 ext. 2105 or by email at marsenault@bradley-morris.com.

 

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